What is Considered Promoting Prostitution in Oregon

What is Considered Promoting Prostitution in Oregon

Across the United States, prostitution is a point of contention and people argue about whether it’s good or bad. In fact, according to research found by Marist Poll, “Nearly half of U.S. residents, 49% report prostitution between two consenting adults should be legal while 44% disagree.” Despite the back and forth on the morality of prostitution, it’s still illegal.

In Oregon, it’s a crime to buy or sell sex, force somebody else to engage in prostitution, or facilitate prostitution. There are specific prostitution laws against the person selling sex, and separate patronizing laws against those who buy sex.

All these different terms and laws can get a bit confusing. To clarify for anyone who has been charged with a crime involving some aspect of prostitution, below is a guide to what is considered promoting prostitution.

Promoting Prostitution

Often called “pimping” or “pandering,” promoting prostitution laws are aimed at the people or organizations that benefit from, or help others commit, prostitution. A big caveat for these laws is that the defendant must know that prostitution is occurring.

More specifically, according to Oregon state law a person promotes prostitution if he or she:

  • Owns, manages, or supervises a place of prostitution
  • Forces a person to engage in prostitution or stay at a place of prostitution
  • Receives, or agrees to receive, compensation in return for a prostitution activity
  • Engages in any conduct that facilitates an act or enterprise of prostitution

Another act considered as promoting prostitution is if a person encourages another to take part in either side of a sex-for-money transaction. Promoting prostitution is a multi-faceted act and getting charged with such a crime comes with many consequences.

Examples of Promoting Prostitution

  • Procuring a prostitute for a patron
  • Causing another to become or remain a prostitute intentionally
  • Soliciting clients for another person who is a prostitute
  • Driving someone to a known place of prostitution
  • Encouraging a person to leave a state for prostitution purposes
  • Letting your house, vehicle, or property be knowingly used for prostitution

If you’re charged with promoting prostitution, it is considered a Class C felony in Oregon. This means the crime is punishable with up to five years in prison and a fine up to $125,000. Promoting prostitution is a serious crime, and the consequences of participating are severe in Oregon as well. If you or someone you know is charged with such a crime, get in contact with a Clackamas Country sex crime defense attorney. In situations like these, you want to have the best for your defense.